Relationships and the MBTI®

Relationships and the MBTI®

Ok! Ok!  I’ll admit it!  I am somewhat technically challenged so doing a blog is a little outside my comfort zone!  I have been so focused on the technical aspects of the blog that I missed an important spelling error.  My apologies to those who tried to e-mail to the address I put in the last blog as I left an ‘s’ out of it. The correct e-mail address is lrassess@telus.net .

Let’s face it, not many of us really understand our spouses or partners.  Would you like to?  Do you think it would improve your relationship if you did?  Learning to understand and communicate with others is one of the values of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® and can lead to a greater appreciation of what they bring to a relationship.  This is true not only for our personal relationships but also our day-to-day interactions with those we work and socialize with as well.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is grounded in the work of Carl Jung, a Swiss psychiatrist, who in the 1920’s developed the idea of personality preferences.  From Jung’s work the MBTI tool was created by Isabel Myers and her mother Katherine Briggs in 1942.  Their purpose was to make information about personality types and appreciating individual differences available to a wide range of people.

There are 16 distinct personality types, none of them bad, and they each bring their own gift to the things they do on a daily basis.  By understanding each other’s type we gain knowledge into how we can work and communicate with each other and as a result have a much better relationship.

Family dynamics are especially susceptible to communications issues as parents and children grow as a unit and stretch to co-exist in the household.  Everyone’s learning style is different and in order to bring out the best in each other we need to know how to approach that individual so they can react in the appropriate manner.  The Murphy Meisgier is a version of the Myers-Briggs designed for children and when given in conjunction with the rest of the family can be of tremendous value.

To find out more, contact us at lrassess@telus.net or stay tuned to the blog for our updates!

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